onion 1

Healthy Appetizing Eating with Onion Flower

It take less effort to each healthy food when is creative and appetizing.Try this method and you will enjoy onions even more. I suggest you find small red onions for this if you intend on putting them on a plate with other food items. Large onions would dress up a a serving platter quite nicely though.

idealist

Idealists Brain tumor teenage victim donates organs

An 11-year-old boy in south China’ s Guangdong Province recently touched many hearts by choosing to donate his organs during the last moments of his life. Liang Yaoyi, whose life was ended by a brain tumor last Friday, gave new life to others by electing to donate his kidneys, liver and corneas.

sussman

Galleries: Matt Mullican’s hypnotic world

Of the artists who composed the Pictures Generation – Cindy Sherman, Richard Prince, Barbara Kruger, Sherrie Levine, David Salle, and others who appropriated images from various sources in their art – Matt Mullican, born in Los Angeles in 1951 to artist parents, and a student of John Baldessari at the California Institute of the Arts, always seemed to be off in his own world.

Looking at Mullican’s mid-1970s pictographs of everyday signs (say, the isolated male figure indicating the men’s room, or the lighted cigarette with the diagonal line crossing it) arranged in grids, you sensed there was something more to Mullican’s preoccupation with the simple symbols guiding civilized human behavior than met the eye.

It became known that Mullican’s art was a virtual map of his subconscious, Read more

placebo

You can train your body into thinking it’s had medicine

You can train your body into thinking it’s had medicine
Jo Marchant asks if we can harness the mind to reduce side-effects and slash drug costs.

9 February 2016
Marette Flies was 11 when her immune system turned against her. A cheerful student from Minneapolis, Minnesota, she had curly brown hair and a pale, moon-shaped face, and she loved playing trumpet in her high-school band. But in 1983, she was diagnosed with lupus, a condition in which the immune system destroys the body’s healthy tissues.

It ran rampant, attacking her body on multiple fronts. She was given steroids to suppress her immune system; the drugs made her face swell up, and her hair fell out onto her pillow and into her food. But despite the treatment her condition worsened over the next two years, with inflamed kidneys, seizures and high blood pressure. She suffered frequent headaches and her whole body was in pain. Read more

cancer

75% of patients have Cancerphobia Fear of Cancer

An exceptional essay in the April issue of Lancet explores why even healthy, asymptomatic people are terrified when they hear the word “cancer.”  Robert Aronowitz, an internist and professor of the history and sociology of science at the University of Pennsylvania, describes “cancerphobia,” a term coined in the 1950s by a Cleveland Clinic surgeon who […]

Weight Loss An Apple a day

Weight loss requires healthy eating and fruits are essential part of proper nutrition. in this video Cut your apples faster, and keep them from turning brown. Everybody cuts apples similarly, so this video shows you How to cut up apples.

Weight Loss Hypnosis

Hypnotherapy part of pain treatment

pain1DEAR DOCTOR K: I am in near-constant pain because of arthritis. My doctor suggested that I try hypnotherapy. My first reaction was that it sounds like hokum, but now I’m wondering if it could help. What do you think?

DEAR READER: Hypnotherapy may in fact help with pain management. These days it is used to treat many mental and physical health problems. I spoke to my colleague Dr. Max Shapiro, a psychologist with Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital. He
explained that hypnotherapy is most effective in treating problems that require stronger control over the body’s responses. Pain is a good example; insomnia is another.

Hypnotherapy turns your attention inward. A hypnotherapist helps you enter a trancelike state. In that state, your attention is highly focused, so you’re more responsive to suggestions. With the guidance of a hypnotherapist, you can start to control or alter your thoughts, feelings and physical state. A hypnotic trance empowers you to activate neural circuits that are otherwise inactive. When activated, this circuitry can reduce pain, among other things.

Let’s consider insomnia. Hypnosis can be very effective in blocking out the distracting chatter that interferes with sleep. A hypnotherapist will first teach a patient how to go into a trance. Once in a trance, the patient will focus on his or her own past experience of falling asleep easily, effortlessly and comfortably. The patient will then be taught to practice going into a trance at bedtime and re-creating those feelings.

About half of people who use hypnotherapy for insomnia see improvement after a few sessions. Others require several more sessions. Only about one in 10 people won’t find it useful.

The success rate for hypnotherapy in treating pain is much more complicated. That may be because the source and nature of pain can vary so widely. Some people experience quick and long-lasting relief; others find it more challenging.

Hypnotherapy may be much more effective for some people than for others. In part, a successful outcome depends on how committed you are. In order for hypnotherapy to work, you will need to put the lessons learned at each session into practice at home. If you need an outside voice to help you focus inward, recordings may help to get you into a trance state.

Hypnotherapy is typically a complementary therapy. That means it should be part of a broader treatment plan that may include more traditional pain relief techniques and medications, if needed.

Like most doctors, I was skeptical that hypnosis really could work to help relieve suffering. It seemed like magic, and I don’t believe in magic. But now we know that the brain experiences symptoms — like pain — and that the brain has its own natural ways of relieving those symptoms. However, those “natural” ways often lie dormant and need to be activated. Hypnosis is a way of activating the brain’s ability to quiet bothersome symptoms.

A physician colleague of mine tried hypnosis after no traditional treatments were able to adequately relieve his pain. The treatment was so successful that he now uses hypnosis in his practice. There’s nothing like getting your own suffering relieved to make a believer out of you.

Source
http://auburnpub.com/onlyinprint/dr-k/hypnotherapy-can-be-useful-as-part-of-pain-treatment-plan/article_323ae671-b54f-5abd-819c-28ae43a6d81e.html

Hypnotherapy how I stopped smoking for good

After just one hypnotherapy session, Ramzi Abdulbaki’s life was transformed.

After almost three decades of smoking, the 51-year-old Canadian Lebanese decided enough was enough, and opted for hypnotherapy to help him quit.

He began smoking at the age of 25. On a normal day, he would go through a pack of cigarettes.

“If it was a stressful day, I could go through two packs a day. I’ve quit so many times but always came back.”

On his sister’s recommendation he tried hypnotherapy. “She said that it would help me quit smoking without the hassle.”

Mr Abdulbaki, like most was sceptical at first but the therapy was successful.

“It’s all common sense. She [the hypnotherapist] told me that if I wanted to live to see my grandchildren then I had to quit smoking. You know something is bad for you, but somehow when someone tells it to you in that way, it makes a difference.”

Mr Abdulbaki has not smoked a cigarette in three years ago since that hypnotherapy session.

“It changed my life. I’m now healthy. I lost 15 kilogrammes and went back to gym.”

While the hypnotherapy worked for him, in order for it to be a success he insists “it takes two to tango”.

“I wanted to change.”

Source

The National

Hypnotherapy sees revival at Medical City

ABU DHABI // The capital’s main government hospital is using hypnotherapy to treat everything from smoking and obesity to stress and sleeping disorders.

Sleep HypnosisStaff at the behavioural sciences pavilion (BSP) at Sheikh Khalifa Medical City (SKMC) used the alternative form of therapy in recent months, often with faster and more effective results than conventional treatments.

“The research [on the effectiveness of hypnotherapy] exists in medical journals and it has been validated as a technique since around the 1950s,” said Nasser Al Reyami, the BSP’s resident psychologist and hypnotist.

“It is reviving right now as complimentary therapy that is extremely effective.”

The Emirati sees 10 people at his outpatient clinic every week. With some suffering from phobias, he said the therapy showed results within 20 minutes.

“The idea is hypnosis is like any other form of talk therapy. We just have a different starting point and measurement points to what and how it changes a client’s life.”

People undergoing hypnotherapy are referred to as clients, not patients.

Most are sceptical and scared at first, said Mr Al Reyami, mostly because of an incorrect perception of hypnotherapy gleaned from television.

“That is not hypnosis. Hypnosis is a talk therapy. It is simple. It is a lot less exciting than the movies.”

Hypnotherapy has helped hundreds of Mr Al Reyami’s clients stop smoking, lose weight, overcome drug addictions, depression and behavioural problems.

“When they leave my office they are given homework and assignments – things to do and write about and think about.”

When clients return for their next session, the first thing they are asked is to name three things that have gotten better in their life.

“Sometimes they say nothing and I tell them it’s okay, but try harder and give me any three things. The following week I’ll ask for five things and the harder they have to think about it, the harder they have to go back and find positivity in their life. The philosophy is every day and in every way, it gets better and better.”

Hypnosis, Mr Al Reyami said, is a therapy which is “content free”. He does not need to know any personal information, dates, names. This is particularly useful “in cases where there are abuses happening in the family or has happened and the client does not want to reveal their dirty laundry,” he said.

Kasey Conrad, managing director of Change Works Human Resource consultancy firm and a personal and professional development coach, said “hypnosis is a little faster than psychiatry and psychology in specific things”.

“Quitting smoking is the fastest and requires three or four session at the most. Weight control and stress relief as well.”

Ms Conrad, who uses hypnosis to help hundreds of people every year, agreed with Mr Al Reyami on the misconceptions people have.

“Hypnosis is basically self hypnosis, the hypnotist is the facilitator. It is focused concentration.”

She explained: “Have you even been driving home and you’ve taken that same route 100 times and then driving home one day you suddenly find yourself at the destination without even realising it? That’s hypnosis. It’s when your conscious mind goes away and your subconscious mind is taking you where you need to go.”

On the popular misconception that a hypnotist can control a person and make them do things, she said: “Hypnosis is a state of relaxation and focused concentration. You are always aware of what is going around you. A hypnotist can not, no matter what you see, make someone do something that is completely against their morals or ethical code.”

Another myth Mrs Conrad was happy to disprove was that if a hypnotist falls dead in the middle of a session, a subject will remain hypnotised for the rest of their life.

“This is completely not true.”

Hypnosis can be viewed as supplementary to other types of therapy.

“We never diagnose or ever suggest that anyone stop seeing their therapist or stop taking medication or whether its right or not right to take medication, people will ask us and we tell them, that its not up to us, we don’t have the knowledge or qualification to address that,” she said.

In the UAE, hypnotherapy is a relatively new option.

“People don’t understand what it is and what it can do for them. Complimentary therapies are very popular across the world, here they are just beginning,” she said.

Source:
http://www.thenational.ae/uae/health/hypnotherapy-sees-revival-at-abu-dhabis-sheikh-khalifa-medical-city

Donald Trump’s loss in Iowa breaks the mass hypnosis

Just when some in the Republican establishment were reportedly falling for the hypnotic allure of Donald Trump, he’s gone and broken the spell.

Until now he was all about winning.

That was his formula for making “America great again.”

It was the very style and substance of his campaign, reducible to Vince Lombardi’s quote, “Winning isn’t everything, it’s the only thing.”

“We will have so much winning if I get elected that you may get bored with winning!” he promised.

And for Trump, winning was also the ends that justified the meanness.

Everyone was meant to recognize that the misogyny, the racism, the xenophobia et cetera, were simply the behaviour of a winner. Winners don’t make time for political correctness.

It seemed such an effective brand, that winning thing.

And then Monday night he didn’t win. He came second.

Even Trump wouldn’t argue that a silver medal is the new gold.

Now he lives under the shadow of another great Lombardi dictum: “Show me a good loser, and I’ll show you a loser.”

Onward and upward to New Hampshire

Humility and introspection are not Trump’s natural strengths, so he won’t dwell on Iowa. He’ll soon put it in the past, as will his most devout followers, and onward they will go.

But for the rest of us, it offers an opportunity for some rethinking.

Trump blood in the water gives pause to reflect on how the race has changed this week now that reality has brought the wild expectations for Trump to heel.

What’s next?

Cruz sealed a victory in the Republican Iowa caucuses, winning on the strength of his relentless campaigning and support from his party’s diehard conservatives. (Chris Carlson/Associated Press)

But his strength in Iowa is presumed to have been among evangelical voters, and there won’t be many of them turning out for the New Hampshire primary next week.

Other contenders?

There is a small cluster of candidates who are starving for oxygen and whose campaigns may live or die on the New Hampshire result — governors Chris Christie, John Kasich and Jeb Bush, as well as Carly Fiorina, Ben Carson and Kentucky Senator Rand Paul — all long shots.

But Marco Rubio, the Florida senator, isn’t a long shot anymore.

Ticket out of Iowa

There is something called the “three tickets out of Iowa” theory (retailed by Iowans) that says if you finish in the top three in the Iowa caucuses you’ll have a chance to make it to the White House. If you don’t, you won’t.

Rubio got a ticket out of Iowa.

Now he’s poised to become the standard bearer for the Republican establishment.

It’s the first time anything like it has happened in this race.

Trump’s loss Monday was big, in part because of how dangerously close he came to finishing third behind Rubio (Trump, 24 per cent, Rubio 23 per cent).

Not for months has a candidate from the so-called establishment lane come anywhere near to cracking through the 20 per cent barrier in public opinion.

One reason Trump has dominated the polls for so long is that the establishment lane is crowded with candidates divvying up the available support.

In another time, Rubio might have been thought too far from the mainstream of the Republican Party to be an establishment candidate.

He was elected to the Senate in the Tea Party wave of 2010, is a rigid opponent of abortion rights and the Supreme Court’s ruling on same sex marriage, and even wound up opposing his own immigration reform bill a few years ago.

But such is the state of the party in 2016 that Rubio might be the establishment’s last best hope for heading off a Trump (or Cruz) insurgency.

The long game

Assuming that’s still what they want to do. It might not be.

Just as a way out of their mess appears on the horizon, there are at least some Republicans who think that the best way to manage the crisis in their party is to not manage it at all.

The murmuring in the corridors of Iowa’s caucuses this week went like this:

A Rubio nomination would frustrate grassroots Republicans and millions of them might not bother to vote in November, putting the Democrats back in charge of the White House and probably the Senate too.

If that’s what the future looks like, then why not lose with Trump (or Cruz), and let the hankering for revolution get spent, rather than lose with Rubio and see the internal roiling that’s bedevilled the party since 2008 continue for another election cycle.

That seems a desperate solution. But Republicans who have been horrified by what they’ve seen their party go through this season recognize they can’t move past the problem by pretending it will just go away, and this seems one route to resolving it.

Another route, of course is President Trump (or Cruz).

http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/iowa-primary-republicans-trump-cruz-rubio-1.3431320